80% of Comments on Tweets from Famous Projects are from Phishing Scam Accounts: SlowMist

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By BitcoinWiki News

Key Takeaways:

– Approximately 80% of comments on tweets from famous projects are occupied by phishing scam accounts
– Scammers have found a way to purchase Twitter accounts, some even mimic the usernames of well-known projects
– Scammers employ promotional tools to boost their credibility, such as buying followers, likes, and shares for their accounts
– They monitor the activities of well-known projects and use automated bots to ensure that their comments appear first under project tweets
– Example of deceptive tactic occurred when the official Optimism Twitter account posted a tweet
– Several countermeasures can be implemented to counteract these phishing scams, such as integrating anti-phishing plugins and implementing wallet signature verification and interaction safety features
– Responsibility for personal security awareness ultimately lies with the users themselves
– Building a strong security mindset and exercising caution when clicking links, authorizing transactions, or signing messages is crucial in protecting oneself from falling into these traps


I. Overview
– Approximately 80% of comments on tweets from famous projects are occupied by phishing scam accounts.
– The SlowMist Security Team has been inundated with reports of theft within the cryptocurrency community, many of which were caused by phishing comments posted under tweets from well-known project accounts.

II. Modus Operandi of Scams Targeting Famous Projects
– Scammers have found a way to purchase Twitter accounts, with numerous Telegram groups and dedicated websites offering these accounts for sale.
– They mimic the usernames of well-known projects, creating a false sense of trust, and employ promotional tools to boost their credibility.
– Phishing groups proceed to mimic the information found in legitimate project accounts and use automated bots to ensure that their comments appear first under project tweets.
– An example of this deceptive tactic occurred when the official Optimism Twitter account posted a tweet earlier this month.

III. Fake Account Impersonating Optimism
– The first comment under the tweet, which received high interaction, was from a phishing group and included a link to their “official website.”
– A closer examination of the link revealed it to be a phishing link, cleverly disguised to appear legitimate.

IV. Countermeasures
– Users can integrate anti-phishing plugins to detect and alert fake domain names associated with phishing incidents.
– Wallet signature verification and interaction safety features can serve as a final barrier against phishing attempts.
– However, the responsibility for personal security awareness ultimately lies with the users themselves.

V. Conclusion
– Building a strong security mindset and exercising caution when clicking links, authorizing transactions, or signing messages is crucial in protecting oneself from falling into these traps.

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